Rustic Cornish Pasties

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My love for Cornish Pasties began on a trip to England a few years back. We were rushing to catch a train to Warwick castle early one morning, but stomaches rumbling, we realized we hadn’t eaten breakfast. And like a sign from the heavens, there was the pasty stand. Glorious smells wafting and golden light filling the cases, showcasing these flaky crusts calling my name. I needed one, and one I did get.

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It may sound silly to get so overly excited about a quick bite to eat. Maybe it was the jet lag, maybe it was the chilly, damp London October weather. Maybe it was the over excitement of the trip in general. But boy, did that pasty hit the spot.

As you’ll see in this picture, I had rushed onto the train, sat down, and sunk my teeth into that thing before Alex even hopped on board.

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For those of you who don’t know, a pasty is basically a pastry filled with savory fillings, (sort of like a hot pocket. But a million times better). Dating back hundreds of years  agp, Miners would bring pasties to work, becuase it was lunch all wrapped up in a pocket. Practically mess free and easy to eat.

So, when we were on vacation two weeks ago, something about it reminded me of our trip to England. Mainly the weather , but I just got this craving for them. They have become one of my favorite comfort foods. You can make a million different flavor combinations, and they’re easy to assemble and freeze for a grab and go meal anytime!

If you’re a fan of hot pockets, this is a perfect example of cooking a ready made meal from scratch. You can assemble 6-8 of these in 30 minutes, and the benefits are plenty. Firstly, you can put whatever you want in them! More veggies, more cheese, whole wheat crust. Change it to suit your needs, whether they be dietary or for fun. Plus, you’re skipping all of the preservatives and funny ingredients in the pre packaged stuff.  You’ll also save a ton of money making them on your own. Sounds good to me!

Now typically, a Cornish Pasty was filled with uncooked ingredients. This is my version of it because I like to make a creamy sauce to add a little more flavor. The one I had in England consisted of bacon, potatoes, and cheddar cheese, so I wanted to focus on something similar.

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 Rustic Cornish Pasties

Makes 6-8

What You’ll Need:

+ 2 cups all purpose flour

+ 2 teaspoons salt

+ 1/2 teaspoon baking powder

+ 1/4 cup shortening

+ 1/2 cup butter

+ 1/3 cup ice cold water

For the Filling:

(Here’s where you can get creative! I’ll list what I made as an example)

+ 1/2 pound beef sirloin steak, cubed

+ 1- 1/2 cups potatoes, cubed, boiled

+ 3 green onions (tops included)

+ 4 slices bacon, diced

+ 1/2 cup cheddar cheese

+ 1 teaspoon salt

+ 1/2 teaspoon pepper

+ 1/4 cup milk

+ 2 Tbsp. butter

+ 2 Tbsp. flour

To make the pastry, combine the flour, salt, and baking powder in a bowl. Cut the shortening and butter in with a fork or pastry cutter, until it forms coarse crumbs. Add the ice water a little at a time, until it forms a dough (not sticky). Wrap in saran wrap and refrigerate while making the filling.

In a large skillet over medium heat, cook the bacon and steak together until cooked (about 5-8 minutes). Remove from pan. Add the butter into the pan until melted. Whisk in the flour, making a roux. Pour in the milk, continuiously whisking until lump free. Add in the cheese and other filling ingredients. Fold until all are mixed in well.

Divide the dough into 6 balls. Roll each into a 6 inch circle. Dampen the edges with water, and add 1/2 cup filling on each circle. Fold over and seal the edges. Crimp with a fork. Cut a thin slice into the top to allow steam to escape. Brush with a beaten egg for glaze, if desired.

Bake at 350 degreees for 40-45 minutes.

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